Pediatrics

January 14, 2020

Staying Safe on the Slopes: Tips for Skiing and Snowboarding

By Trisha McBride Ferguson For skiing and snowboarding enthusiasts, winter sports make the months of colder temperatures more bearable. Speeding down the slopes brings a rush of adrenaline, a feeling of freedom — and all too often, injuries. Here’s what you need to know to stay safe on the slopes this season. Know the Risks […]

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January 10, 2020

Why Diagnosing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Is Critical (Video)

By William Allen, MD Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term used to describe the range of effects that can occur in an individual who was prenatally exposed to alcohol. FASD is not a clinical diagnosis, rather a term that includes a group of developmental disorders resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. There Is […]

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January 7, 2020

Understanding Obesity by Talking to Your Child’s Doctor about Weight

By Evelyn M. Artz, MD About 17 percent of children and adolescents are obese. Overweight and obese children are at risk for weight-related problems as they grow. Part of providing excellent healthcare for children and adolescents involves discussing weight at doctor’s appointments. How Do We Define Obesity? Children and adolescents should have both their height […]

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November 20, 2019

A Special Bonding: Kangaroo Care Gave Neonatal ICU Baby Josephine a Steady Start

Most expectant parents don’t prepare for their newborn to go into the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit [NICU] after labor,” said Caroline Twiggs from Weaverville. “Now I tell friends they should tour the NICU.” High blood pressure and a prolonged delivery were hard on Twiggs and her husband, Michael Whetsell. But when baby Josephine showed distress, […]

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November 5, 2019

Does Flat Head Syndrome Affect a Baby’s Brain Development?

By Meg Coleman, Nurse Practitioner If you’re a new parent, you may feel concerned about your infant developing flat head syndrome, or positional plagiocephaly. So what can you do about it? Plagiocephaly occurs when a baby’s head develops a flat spot – it can be on either a side or on the back of the […]

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November 1, 2019

It’s Personal: How Mission Hospital’s NICU Goes Above and Beyond

Baby Owen was due to enter the world in August of 2016. His mother, Amanda Bauman, 35, of Waynesville, had experienced a healthy pregnancy, and all was going as planned…until an obstetrics appointment in late June led to an emergency C-section. Bauman’s August baby arrived, surprisingly, on June 21. A Sudden Turn of Events “I […]

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October 30, 2019

Tips and Reminders to Avoid the ER on Halloween

Carving pumpkins and trick-or-treating may seem like harmless fun, but Halloween injuries send many children to emergency rooms in the United States every year. Out of eight holidays, Halloween had the fifth-highest number of ER visits involving children aged 18 years and younger, according to 2007-2013 data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, with […]

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October 11, 2019

Halloween and Asthma: Don’t Let Allergies or Asthma Get in the Way of Halloween Fun

By Steven Julius, MD, Pediatric Pulmonologist Wearing masks made of latex and taking hayrides are among the Halloween festivities that could be risky for children with asthma, according to the American Lung Association. And we can’t forget about the happiness and entertainment that pumpkins on display bring on the wonders of Halloween. But what happens […]

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September 30, 2019

Ensuring Our Youngest Cancer Patients Receive State-of-the-art Care Close to Home

By Douglas Scothorn, MD, and Ginna Priola, MD In most people’s lives, September represents the changing of the leaves, pumpkin spice lattes and yellow school buses picking up excited kids returning to school. However, for our families at Mission Children’s Hospital, it’s a month to recognize the courageous battles being fought by their children. September […]

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September 26, 2019

Teens and Suicide: Talking (and Listening) to Your Child Can Lead to Prevention

Hearing the words “I don’t care” or “nothing matters” from your teen should be a red flag for parents. “While these comments could be chalked up to teen drama, they could also be a cry for help,” said Ashley Carver, DO, a pediatrician with Mission Pediatrics – McDowell. Teenage years can be tumultuous and fraught […]

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